Denebola distance from earth

Although it is not entirely clear how the constellation Leo became known to the ancient Egyptians, one enchanting piece of star lore goes as follows. The ancient Egyptians worshiped Leo because they knew the Sun entered the constellation during the Flooding of the Nile, which brought significant amounts of water and fertile soil onto the land. Food security in Egypt depended on this annual natural cycle, a circumstance that also coincided with the arrival of desert lions at the river. Although the lions moved toward the river to avoid the heat and lack of water in the desert at that time, a connection was made by the Egyptians, who honored the lion with festivals, and even today many statues of lions can be found along the course of the Nile River, proof of the reverence with which the ancient Egyptians regarded the desert lions.

This list of nearest bright stars is a table of stars found within 15 parsecs ( light-years ) of the Sun that have an absolute magnitude of + or brighter, which is approximately comparable to a listing of stars more luminous than a red dwarf . Right ascension and declination coordinates are for the epoch J2000 . The distance measurements are based on the Hipparcos Catalogue and other astrometric data. In the event of a spectroscopic binary , the combined spectral type and absolute magnitude are listed in italics .

Denebola shows a strong infrared excess , which most likely means there is a circumstellar debris disk of cool dust in orbit around it. [18] As the solar system is believed to have formed out of such a disk, Denebola and similar stars such as Vega and Beta Pictoris may be candidate locations for extrasolar planets . The dust surrounding Denebola has a temperature of about 120 K (−153 °C). Observations with the Herschel Space Observatory have provided resolved images, which show the disk to be located at a radius of 39  astronomical units from the star, or 39 times the distance from the Earth to the Sun. [19]

Certain commercial concerns offer to "name" stars for individuals—at a price. These star "registries" have no official sanction. Astronomical objects are named by the International Astronomical Union, according to internationally agreed-upon protocols which do not permit naming stars for living persons. Stars rarely get names these days, but catalog numbers But while you cannot legitimately name a star for yourself or a friend or family member, we invite you to observe a star whose light is as old as you are, or they are, and to possess a photo of it if you like. Like the night sky, it's free!

Crab Nebula (M1)
Lagoon Nebula (M8)
Eagle Nebula (M16)
Omega Nebula (M17)
Trifid Nebula (M20)
Dumbbell Nebula (M27)
Andromeda Galaxy (M31)
Triangulum Galaxy (M33)
Orion Nebula (M42)
Praesepe (M44)
Pleiades (M45)
Whirlpool Galaxy (M51)
Ring Nebula (M57)
Sunflower Galaxy (M63)
Black Eye Galaxy (M64)
Bode's Galaxy (M81)
Cigar Galaxy (M82)
Southern Pinwheel Galaxy (M83)
Owl Nebula (M97)
Pinwheel Galaxy (M101)
Sombrero Galaxy (M104)
Messier 106
Cassiopeia A
Coalsack Nebula
Hyades
Helix Nebula
Butterfly Nebula
Carina Nebula
Heart Nebula
Soul Nebula
Cat's Eye Nebula
Cygnus X-1
Horsehead Nebula
Flame Nebula
Hourglass Nebula
Rosette Nebula
Sagittarius A
Arches Cluster
Quintuplet Cluster
Stephan's Quintet
Omega Centauri
Eskimo Nebula
Blue Flash Nebula
Centaurus A
Large Magellanic Cloud
Tarantula Nebula
Red Spider Nebula
Veil Nebula
Cartwheel Galaxy
Double Cluster
Boomerang Nebula
Monkey Head Nebula
Jewel Box Cluster
Cone Nebula
Christmas Tree Cluster
Fox Fur Nebula
Snowflake Cluster
Prawn Nebula
Supernova SN 2014J
Antennae Galaxies
Eyes Galaxies
Siamese Twins Galaxies
Thor's Helmet
Twin Jet Nebula
Bubble Nebula
Witch Head Nebula
Cat's Paw Nebula
Calabash Nebula
Stingray Nebula
Antlia Dwarf
Boötes I
Flaming Star Nebula
Phantom Streak Nebula
Westerlund 2 and Gum 29
Darth Vader's Galaxy
Condor Galaxy (NGC 6872)
NGC 1277
NGC 1365
NGC 1569
NGC 1679
NGC 6101
NGC 772

Denebola distance from earth

denebola distance from earth

Certain commercial concerns offer to "name" stars for individuals—at a price. These star "registries" have no official sanction. Astronomical objects are named by the International Astronomical Union, according to internationally agreed-upon protocols which do not permit naming stars for living persons. Stars rarely get names these days, but catalog numbers But while you cannot legitimately name a star for yourself or a friend or family member, we invite you to observe a star whose light is as old as you are, or they are, and to possess a photo of it if you like. Like the night sky, it's free!

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